Covid 19 and the myth of security

Hamourtziadou, Lily and Jackson, Jonathan (2020) Covid 19 and the myth of security. Journal of Global Faultlines, 7 (1). pp. 96-98. ISSN 2397-7825

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Abstract

In April 1946, the former leaders of the Nazi regime faced trial at Nuremberg for crimes they committed against the peoples of Europe. These men became the embodiment of evil and provided a clear indication of the crimes carried out in the name of national security. What is often forgotten in the euphoric atmosphere of victory is those who sat in judge-ment. The judges representing the Soviet Union were themselves advocates of a barbaric political regime, which had organized the death and detention of millions of its own citi-zens. As for the USA, by dropping the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki the previ-ous year, the Americans caused the deaths of 250,000 civilians. Churchill was considered a hero during the WWII period, but in 1919 he had advocated the use of chemical weapons (primarily against Kurds and Afghans), which killed tens of thousands of people, while later in 1943, in Bengal-India at least 3 million people are believed to have died as a direct result of Churchill’s decisions and actions.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.13169/jglobfaul.7.1.0096
Date: 10 October 2020
Subjects: L200 Politics
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Criminology and Sociology
REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA20: Social Work and Social Policy
Depositing User: Lily Hamourtziadou
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2020 09:52
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2020 15:35
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10127

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