Multicultural Hybridism as a Dynamic Framework to Reconceptualise Breakout in a Superdiverse and Transnational Context

Shinnie, Xiping and Domboka, T. and Carey, Charlotte Multicultural Hybridism as a Dynamic Framework to Reconceptualise Breakout in a Superdiverse and Transnational Context. In: Contemporary Issues in Entrepreneurship Research Series: Migration and Entrepreneurship. Emerald. (In Press)

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Abstract

The conceptual framework of Multicultural Hybridism is adopted to reflect the emerging themes of transnationalism and superdiversity in the context of ethnic minority migrant entrepreneurs breaking out of their ethnic enclaves into mainstream economy. It is constructed as an extension of Mixed Embeddedness theory (Kloosterman, 2006), given that ‘Multicultural Hybrid’ (Arrighetti, Bolzani, and Lasagni, 2014) firms display stronger resilience with a higher survival rate than enclaved businesses (Kloosterman, Rusinovic, and Yeboah, 2016). With further integration of incremental diversification typology (Lassalle and Scott, 2018), the current study adopts Multicultural Hybridism as a lens to explore the opportunity recognition capabilities of transnational, migrant entrepreneurs who are facilitated by the hybridity of opportunity recognition (Lassalle, 2018) from linking host-country and home-country cultures. The hybridity of opportunity recognition focuses on access to markets and resources between transnational ethnic and local multicultural mainstream markets. Through the theoretical lens of Multicultural Hybridism, interviews with 16 Birmingham-based Chinese migrant entrepreneurs have been analysed to shape a dynamic understanding of the multifaceted concept of breakout in a superdiverse and transnational context. The multilayered interpretation of breakout provides an enhanced understanding of the diversity of hybridism between transnational ethnic and local multicultural mainstream markets. This is seen from the perspectives of firm growth and social integration in the current locations and future spaces of transnational migrant entrepreneurs. It goes beyond the narrow imagination of breakout as an economic assimilation process, avoiding the singular conceptualisation of the host-country mainstream market as the only breakout destination for transnational ethnic entrepreneurs.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: Multicultural Hybridism Superdiversity Transnationalism Mixed Embeddedness Breakout
Subjects: N100 Business studies
N200 Management studies
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > Birmingham City Business School > Centre for Enterprise, Innovation and Growth
Depositing User: Charlotte Carey
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2021 11:59
Last Modified: 08 Jan 2021 11:59
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10690

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