A cross-sectional survey of general practice health workers’ perceptions of their provision of culturally competent services to ethnic minority people with diabetes

Zeh, Peter and Cannaby, Ann Marie and Sandhu, Harbinder K. and Warwick, Jane and Sturt, Jackie (2018) A cross-sectional survey of general practice health workers’ perceptions of their provision of culturally competent services to ethnic minority people with diabetes. Primary Care Diabetes, 12 (6). pp. 501-509. ISSN 1751-9918

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Abstract

Aims
To explore General Practice teams cultural-competence, in particular, ethnicity, linguistic skillset and cultural awareness. The practice teams’ access to diabetes-training, and overall perception of cultural-competence were also assessed.

Methods
A cross-sectional single-city-survey with one in three people with diabetes from an ethnic minority group, using 35 semi-structured questions was completed. Self-reported data analysed using descriptive statistics, interpreted with reference to the Culturally-Competent-Assessment-Tool.

Results
Thirty-four (52%) of all 66 practices in Coventry responded between November 2011 and January 2012. Key findings: (1) One in five practice staff was from a minority group in contrast with one in ten of Coventry’s population, (2) 164 practice staff (32%) spoke a second language relevant to the practice's minority population, (3) 56% of practices were highly culturally-competent at providing diabetes services for minority populations, (4) 94% of practices reported the ethnicity of their populations, and (5) the most frequently stated barriers to culturally-competent service delivery were language and knowledge of nutritional habits.

Conclusions
Culturally-competent diabetes care is widespread across the city. Language barriers are being addressed, cultural knowledge of diabetes-related-nutrition requires further improvement. Further studies should investigate if structured cultural-competence training for diabetes service providers produces positive effects in diabetes-related outcome-measures in minority populations.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcd.2018.07.016
Date: 23 August 2018
Uncontrolled Keywords: General practice Primary care Diabetes care Cultural competences Cultural awareness Linguistic competences Diabetes knowledge Ethnic minority groups
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Gemma Tonks
Date Deposited: 26 May 2021 13:27
Last Modified: 26 May 2021 13:27
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/11682

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