The effects of sodium bicarbonate supplementation at individual time-to-peak blood bicarbonate on 4-km cycling time trial performance in the heat

Gough, Lewis A. and Williams, Jake J. and Newbury, Josh W. and Gurton, William H. (2021) The effects of sodium bicarbonate supplementation at individual time-to-peak blood bicarbonate on 4-km cycling time trial performance in the heat. European Journal of Sport Science. pp. 1-9. ISSN 1746-1391

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of individualised sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) supplementation according to a pre-established individual time-to-peak (TTP) blood bicarbonate (HCO3−) on 4-km cycling time trial (TT) performance in the heat. Eleven recreationally trained male cyclists (age: 28 ± 6 years, height: 180 ± 6 cm, body mass: 80.5 ± 8.4 kg) volunteered for this study in a randomised, crossover, triple-blind, placebo-controlled design. An initial visit was conducted to determine TTP HCO3− following 0.2 g.kg−1 body mass (BM) NaHCO3 ingestion. Subsequently, on three separate occasions, participants completed a 4-km cycling TT in the heat (30 degrees centigrade; °C) (relative humidity ∼40%) following ingestion of either NaHCO3 (0.2 g.kg−1 body mass), a sodium chloride placebo (0.2 g.kg−1 BM; PLA) at the predetermined individual TTP HCO3−, or no supplementation (control; CON) . Absolute peak [HCO3−] prior to the 4-km cycling TT's was elevated for NaHCO3 compared to PLA (+2.8 mmol.l−1; p = 0.002; g = 2.2) and CON (+2.5 mmol.l−1; p < 0.001; g = 2.1). Completion time following NaHCO3 was 5.6 ± 3.2 s faster than PLA (1.6%; CI: 2.8, 8.3; p = 0.001; g = 0.2) and 4.7 ± 2.8 s faster than CON (1.3%; CI: 2.3, 7.1; p = 0.001; g = 0.2). These results demonstrate that NaHCO3 ingestion at a pre-established individual TTP HCO3− improves 4-km cycling TT performance in the heat, likely through enhancing buffering capacity.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2021.1998644
Dates:
DateEvent
27 October 2021Accepted
21 November 2021Published Online
Uncontrolled Keywords: alkalosis, supplements, track cycling, buffering, environmental physiology
Subjects: CAH03 - biological and sport sciences > CAH03-02 - sport and exercise sciences > CAH03-02-01 - sport and exercise sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > Centre for Life and Sport Sciences (C-LASS)
Depositing User: Lewis Gough
Date Deposited: 07 Feb 2022 14:57
Last Modified: 07 Feb 2022 14:57
URI: https://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12774

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