Negative pressure wound therapy for treating pressure ulcers

Dumville, Jo C and Webster, Joan and Evans, Debra and Land, Lucy and Dumville, Jo C (2015) Negative pressure wound therapy for treating pressure ulcers. Cochrane Library (pub2).

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Abstract

Background
Pressure ulcers, also known as bedsores, decubitus ulcers and pressure injuries, are localised areas of injury to the skin or the underlying
tissue, or both. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a treatment option for pressure ulcers; a clear, current overview of the
evidence is required to facilitate decision-making regarding its use.
Objectives
To assess the effects of negative pressure wound therapy for treating pressure ulcers in any care setting.
Search methods
For this review, we searched the following databases in May 2015: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane
Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other
Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. There were no restrictions based on language or date of publication.
Selection criteria
Published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of NPWT with alternative treatments or different
types of NPWT in the treatment of pressure ulcers (stage II or above).
Data collection and analysis
Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction.
Main results
The review contains four studies with a total of 149 participants. Two studies compared NPWT with dressings; one study compared
NPWT with a series of gel treatments and one study compared NPWT with ’moist wound healing’. One study had a 24-week followup
period, and two had a six-week follow-up period, the follow-up time was unclear for one study. Three of the four included studies
were deemed to be at a high risk of bias from one or more ’Risk of bias’ domains and all evidence was deemed to be of very low quality.
Only one study reported usable primary outcome data (complete wound healing), but this had only 12 participants and there were very
few events (only one participant healed in the study). There was little other useful data available from the included studies on positive
outcomes such as wound healing or negative outcomes such as adverse events.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B700 Nursing
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > Centre for Social Care, Health and Related Research (C-SHARR) > Quality of Care
UoA Collections > UoA 03: Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing & Pharmacy
Depositing User: $ Lucy Land
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2016 16:11
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2016 12:57
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3428

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