Assistive tools for disability arts: collaborative experiences in working with disabled artists and stakeholders

Creed, Chris (2016) Assistive tools for disability arts: collaborative experiences in working with disabled artists and stakeholders. Journal of Assistive Technologies, 10 (2). pp. 121-129. ISSN 1754-9450

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Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the experiences in working collaboratively with physically impaired visual artists and other stakeholders (e.g. disability arts organisations, charities, personal assistants, special needs colleges, assistive technologists, etc.) to explore the potential of digital assistive tools to support and transform practice.

Design/methodology/approach – The authors strategically identified key organisations as project partners including Disability Arts Shropshire, Arts Council England, the British Council, SCOPE, and National Star College (a large special needs college). This multi-disciplinary team worked together to develop relationships with disabled artists and to collaboratively influence the research focus around investigating the current practice of physically impaired artists and the impact of digital technologies on artistic work.

Findings – The collaborations with disabled artists and stakeholders throughout the research process have enriched the project, broadened and deepened research impact, and enabled a firsthand understanding of
the issues around using assistive technology for artistic work. Artists and stakeholders have become pro-active collaborators and advocates for the project as opposed to being used only for evaluation purposes. A flexible research approach was crucial in helping to facilitate research studies and enhance impact of the work.

Originality/value – This paper is the first to discuss experiences in working with physically impaired visual artists – including the benefits of a collaborative approach and the considerations that must be made when
conducting research in this area. The observations are also relevant to researchers working with disabled participants in other fields.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1108/JAT-12-2015-0034
Date: 20 June 2016
Uncontrolled Keywords: Assistive technology, Accessibility, Disability art, Disabled artists, Eye gaze tracking, Physical impairment
Subjects: G400 Computer Science
W900 Others in Creative Arts and Design
Divisions: Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Computing and Digital Technology
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Computing and Digital Technology > Cyber Security
REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA11: Computer Science and Informatics
Depositing User: Ian Mcdonald
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2017 13:24
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2020 14:40
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3819

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