Driving, Dashboards and Dromology: Analysing 1980s Videogames Using Paul Virilio’s Theory of Speed

Wade, Alex (2015) Driving, Dashboards and Dromology: Analysing 1980s Videogames Using Paul Virilio’s Theory of Speed. Fast Capitalism, 12 (1). ISSN 1930-014X

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Abstract

The increasing speed of delivery technologies correlates with an increase in inertia for the user of the audiovisual. Employing Virilio’s concept of dromology, the first part of this paper introduces Virilio’s key concepts of speed and inertia upon the perception of space and time by the users of a range of technologies. It is argued that the privileging of ‘time-saving’ ravages traditional notions of space, and generates an additional ‘digital’ space which is at once expansive and also convexed towards the user. Having established the effects of speed and inertia, the main part of the paper extends Virilio’s theory of dromology to provide a context for analysis of a variety of seminal videogames from the 1980s, where driving is a key component. These games of dashboards and vehicles, wars and (wind)screens illustrate Virilio’s central concerns that societies that are addicted to speed are also those which are the most tightly surveilled and controlled.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: L300 Sociology
P300 Media studies
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > Centre for Study of Practice and Culture in Education (C-SPACE) > Re-thinking Creativities
UoA Collections > UoA23: Sociology
UoA Collections > UoA36: Communication, Cultural and Media Studies, Library and Information Management
Depositing User: $ Alex Wade
Date Deposited: 21 Feb 2017 09:39
Last Modified: 21 Feb 2017 10:14
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3839

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