Can Existing Knowledge on Eating Behaviors and Obesity Support People with Cystic Fibrosis Who Are Nutritionally Compromised?

Mantzios, Michail and Egan, Helen and Patchell, Carolyn (2016) Can Existing Knowledge on Eating Behaviors and Obesity Support People with Cystic Fibrosis Who Are Nutritionally Compromised? Frontiers in Psychology, 7. ISSN 1664-1078

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Abstract

Nutritional status is a key predictor of health outcomes and survival for individuals with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). A main concern is the maintenance of a healthy body weight by eating a high-energy and high-fat diet (Abbott et al., 2008). This diet is accompanied for most patients with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, and for some patients with fat soluble vitamins, oral supplements, and enteral tube feeding which further supports the high nutritional requirements (Powers et al., 2002). Nevertheless, inadequate intake in CF remains a major problem within CF populations due to a number of complex reasons including physiological factors such as anorexia or poor appetite (Durie and Pencharz, 1989), early satiety and abdominal pain (Pumariega et al., 1986). Social and psychological factors for inadequate intake in CF include feeling under pressure to eat (Abbott et al., 2008), and being afraid of choking (Murphy and Wootton, 1998). The latest Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Registry Report (2004) indicates that approximately 31% showed symptomatology consistent with malnutrition.
This paper suggests possibilities for developing research further and enhancing behavioral interventions for malnourished individuals with CF. With a paucity of research on the experiences of eating in adults with CF, known information around eating in other populations should be explored. Findings in obesity research may provide useful suggestions for environmental and behavioral interventions with malnourished individuals until a healthy weight status is achieved.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
UoA Collections > UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Depositing User: Silvio Aldrovandi
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2017 15:54
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2017 15:54
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4666

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