Stress in U.K. Mental Health Training: A Multi-dimensional Comparison Study

Galvin, J. and Smith, Andrew (2015) Stress in U.K. Mental Health Training: A Multi-dimensional Comparison Study. British Journal of Education, Society & Behavioural Science, 9 (3). pp. 161-175. ISSN 22780998

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Abstract

Aims: This paper describes a comparison study of trainee clinical psychologists, psychiatric nursing
students and PhD students using a multi-dimensional model of stress.
Methodology: A total of 168 trainee clinical psychologists, 94 psychiatric nursing students and 253
PhD students completed an online questionnaire. Multiple risk factors were measured, including
work characteristics, appraisals, coping, health behaviours, childhood experiences and mental
health outcomes.
Results: Trainee clinical psychologists reported the highest levels of demands, perceived stress
and psychological ill health. Psychiatric nursing students reported the highest levels of emotionbased
coping, which needs to be addressed. Alcohol consumption appears to be an important
coping strategy employed by psychiatric nursing students. Negative childhood experiences were
significantly higher for mental health training groups than PhD students.
Conclusion: Where other research focusing on stress at work or in training environments tends to
consider only a small number of factors in isolation, this study considers multiple factors on outcomes. This approach is more likely to be representative of real-life situations, in which students
are exposed to multiple hazards.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
UoA Collections > UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Depositing User: Silvio Aldrovandi
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2017 09:51
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2017 09:51
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4675

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