Every inch of many effigies: six courthouse songs: music theatre piece for baritone and chamber ensemble: dramatic vocal composition combining lyric singing with extended vocal techniques: analytical commentary

Lee, Joanna (2015) Every inch of many effigies: six courthouse songs: music theatre piece for baritone and chamber ensemble: dramatic vocal composition combining lyric singing with extended vocal techniques: analytical commentary. Doctoral thesis, Birmingham City University.

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Abstract

The topic of this PhD thesis is dramatic vocal composition combining lyric singing with extended vocal techniques. The aim of the research is to compose a music theatre piece or chamber opera for voice and chamber ensemble that exploits both the lyrical singing voice and extended vocal techniques, in ways that are practical and appealing to the lyric singer.

The main submission is Every Inch Of Many Effigies: Six Courthouse Songs (2012/13), a music theatre piece for baritone and chamber ensemble. The composition, twenty-five minutes in duration, is a political satire piece set to a combination of original text by Alan McKendrick and found texts. The work was premiered by Leigh Melrose and Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, conducted by Oliver Knussen in March 2013.

This commentary examines Every Inch Of Many Effigies and its level of success in achieving the above aim. It charts the exploration of the topic and the progression to the final piece through the composition of supporting works.

A key area of research is the discovery and exploration of extended vocal techniques: the considerations and effectiveness of their application with regard to the response of singers, notation and balance. Alongside this, considering the singer in terms of the role of extended vocal techniques in theatrical works and how this can justify their use, the pursuit and integration of lyrical singing and the musical difficulties of contemporary music.

This commentary will discuss the application and success of this research by considering the compositions on paper and practically through their performances.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: W300 Music
Divisions: Faculty of Arts, Design and Media > Birmingham Conservatoire
UoA Collections > PhD Theses Collection
Depositing User: Mr Richard Birley
Date Deposited: 17 Jul 2017 09:24
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2017 10:00
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4848

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