Green-house gas mitigation capacity of a small scale rural biogas plant calculations for Bangladesh through a general Life Cycle Assessment approach

Rahman, K.M. and Melville, L. and Fulford, David and Imamul Huq, S M (2017) Green-house gas mitigation capacity of a small scale rural biogas plant calculations for Bangladesh through a general Life Cycle Assessment approach. Waste Management & Research. ISSN 0734-242X

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Abstract

Calculations towards determining the greenhouse gas mitigation capacity of a small-scale biogas plant (3.2 m3 plant) using cow dung in Bangladesh are presented. A general life cycle assessment was used, evaluating key parameters (biogas, methane, construction
materials and feedstock demands) to determine the net environmental impact. The global warming potential saving through the use of biogas as a cooking fuel is reduced from 0.40 kg CO2 equivalent to 0.064 kg CO2 equivalent per kilogram of dung. Biomethane used for cooking can contribute towards mitigation of global warming. Prior to utilisation of the global warming potential of methane
(from 3.2 m3 biogas plant), the global warming potential is 13 t of carbon dioxide equivalent. This reduced to 2 t as a result of complete combustion of methane. The global warming potential saving of a bioenergy plant across a 20-year life cycle is 217 t of carbon dioxide equivalent, which is 11 t per year. The global warming potential of the resultant digestate is zero and from construction materials is less than 1% of total global warming potential. When the biogas is used as a fuel for cooking, the global warming potential will reduce by 83% compare with the traditional wood biomass cooking system. The total 80 MJ of energy that can be produced from a 3.2 m3 anaerobic digestion plant would replace 1.9 t of fuel wood or 632 kg of kerosene currently used annually in Bangladesh. The digestate can also be used as a nutrient rich fertiliser substituting more costly inorganic fertilisers, with no global warming potential impact.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H800 Chemical, Process and Energy Engineering
Divisions: Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Engineering and the Built Environment
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Engineering and the Built Environment > Resilient Environments
UoA Collections > UoA16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning
Depositing User: Oana-Andreea Dumitrascu
Date Deposited: 14 Aug 2017 07:02
Last Modified: 24 Aug 2017 11:29
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4972

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