Adolescence is associated with genomically patterned consolidation of the hubs of the human brain connectome

Whitaker, Kirstie J. and Vertes, Petra E. and Romero-Garcia, Rafael and Vasa, Frantisek and Moutoussis, Michael and Prabhu, Gita and Weiskopf, Nikolaus and Callaghan, Martina F. and Wagstyl, Konrad and Rittman, Timothy and Tait, Roger and Ooi, Cinly and Suckling, John and Inkster, Becky and Fonagy, Peter and Dolan, Raymond J. and Jones, Peter B. and Goodyer, Ian M. and Bullmore, Edward T. (2016) Adolescence is associated with genomically patterned consolidation of the hubs of the human brain connectome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113 (32). pp. 9105-9110. ISSN 1091-6490

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Abstract

How does human brain structure mature during adolescence? We used MRI to measure cortical thickness and intracortical myelination in 297 population volunteers aged 14–24 y old. We found and replicated that association cortical areas were thicker and less myelinated than primary cortical areas at 14 y. However, association cortex had faster rates of shrinkage and myelination over the course of adolescence. Age-related increases in cortical myelination were maximized approximately at the internal layer of projection neurons. Adolescent cortical myelination and shrinkage were coupled and specifically associated with a dorsoventrally patterned gene expression profile enriched for synaptic, oligodendroglial- and schizophrenia-related genes. Topologically efficient and biologically expensive hubs of the brain anatomical network had greater rates of shrinkage/myelination and were associated with overexpression of the same transcriptional profile as cortical consolidation. We conclude that normative human brain maturation involves a genetically patterned process of consolidating anatomical network hubs. We argue that developmental variation of this consolidation process may be relevant both to normal cognitive and behavioral changes and the high incidence of schizophrenia during human brain adolescence.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G400 Computer Science
Divisions: Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Computing and Digital Technology
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Computing and Digital Technology > Cloud Computing
UoA Collections > UoA11: Computer Science and Informatics
Depositing User: $ Ian McDonald
Date Deposited: 03 Nov 2017 13:38
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2017 13:38
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5269

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