Newly qualified radiographers' perceptions of their abnormality detection abilities and the associated training they received at undergraduate level

Stevens, B and White, N. (2018) Newly qualified radiographers' perceptions of their abnormality detection abilities and the associated training they received at undergraduate level. Radiography. ISSN 10788174

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Abstract

Introduction: Abnormality detection system use across National Health Service (NHS) hospitals is
widespread with radiographer participation considered as fundamental to the role. The “red dot” system
is evolving towards the preliminary clinical evaluation (PCE) system. Newly qualified radiographers will
be expected to be able to provide accurate descriptive comments. Confidence and training issues may
hinder implementation of the PCE system.
Method: An online quantitative survey approach was used. Participants were sought from 24 major
trauma centres (MTC) across England. The sample frame was defined as radiographers who had been
qualified less than 2 years. Approval to approach was granted by all local Research & Development
departments. Cross-tabulation and correlational statistical analyses were undertaken.
Results: Approval to approach radiographers was granted in 17 of the 24 MTCs yielding 85 participants,
63 females and 22 males. The large majority are confident with their red dot skills. Strong correlation
exists between university training and PCE confidence. However, almost a third of participants are not
confident in describing abnormalities. Thirty percent of participants thought PCE training at university
was not suitable, and 55% thought PCE training on placement was not suitable.
Conclusion: While red dot training at university and placement is considered suitable as it positively
affects confidence, participants' views on PCE training are more variable. At university PCE training
positively influences confidence in describing abnormalities, but commenting training on placement is
recognised as an area for improvement. A larger study is suggested to gain further understanding of any
issues hindering widespread PCE implementation.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B800 Medical Technology
B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > School of Health Sciences
UoA Collections > UoA 03: Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing & Pharmacy
Depositing User: Mr Nick White
Date Deposited: 07 Feb 2018 07:09
Last Modified: 07 Feb 2018 07:09
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5608

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