Rising unpaid overtime: a critical approach to existing theories

Papagiannaki, E. (2014) Rising unpaid overtime: a critical approach to existing theories. International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, 8 (1). pp. 68-88. ISSN 1741-8135

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Abstract

In the last period, especially before the current economic crisis began, the phenomenon of employees working long hours without been paid has been observed. This trend appears to have become stronger in the last 15 years but there is ample evidence that the tendency began before then. While there have been various explanations put forward as to why employees work paid overtime, theoretical justification for working unpaid overtime by
neoclassical economics seems to be fragile; deferred compensation theory, human capital theory, signalling, gift economy theory and Pareto Optimality analyses are not sufficient to explain the existence and persistence of unpaid
overtime. Finally an analysis based on Political Economy’s principles is proposed; tendencies of surplus value extraction, capitalist restructuring and trade unions may be capable of comprehending this phenomenon.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: unpaid overtime; surplus value; neoclassical economics; deferred compensation; human capital; signalling; gift economy; Pareto Optimality; restructuring; exploitation; unions.
Subjects: L100 Economics
N100 Business studies
N200 Management studies
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > Birmingham City Business School > Dept. Accountancy and Finance
Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > Birmingham City Business School > Dept. Strategy, Marketing and Economics
Depositing User: Eleni Papagiannaki
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2018 10:26
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2018 10:26
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5676

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