Sleep spindles during a nap correlate with post sleep memory performance for highly rewarded word-pairs

Studte, S. and Bridger, E. and Mecklinger, A. (2015) Sleep spindles during a nap correlate with post sleep memory performance for highly rewarded word-pairs. Brain and Language. ISSN 0093934X (ISSN) (In Press)

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Abstract

The consolidation of new associations is thought to depend in part on physiological processes engaged during non-REM (NREM) sleep, such as slow oscillations and sleep spindles. Moreover, NREM sleep is thought to selectively benefit associations that are adaptive for the future. In line with this, the current study investigated whether different reward cues at encoding are associated with changes in sleep physiology and memory retention. Participants' associative memory was tested after learning a list of arbitrarily paired words both before and after taking a 90-min nap. During learning, word-pairs were preceded by a cue indicating either a high or a low reward for correct memory performance at test. The motivation manipulation successfully impacted retention such that memory declined to a greater extent from pre- to post sleep for low rewarded than for high rewarded word-pairs. In line with previous studies, positive correlations between spindle density during NREM sleep and general memory performance pre- and post-sleep were found. In addition to this, however, a selective positive relationship between memory performance for highly rewarded word-pairs at post test and spindle density during NREM sleep was also observed. These results support the view that motivationally salient memories are preferentially consolidated and that sleep spindles may be an important underlying mechanism for selective consolidation. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Motivation, Nap, Recognition memory, Reward, Sleep spindles, associative memory, human, learning, memory, memory consolidation, motivation, physiology, reward, sleep, sleep spindle
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Divisions: UoA Collections > UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
Depositing User: Miss Jessica Baylis
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2017 10:37
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2017 10:37
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/574

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