Bangladeshi New Women’s ‘Smart’ Dressing: Negotiating class, culture and religion

Hussein, Nazia (2018) Bangladeshi New Women’s ‘Smart’ Dressing: Negotiating class, culture and religion. In: Rethinking New Womanhood Practices of Gender, Class, Culture and Religion in South Asia. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-3-319-67899-3 (In Press)

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Abstract

This chapter places respectable femininity at the centre of the construction and performance of new womanhood among affluent middle-class women of Dhaka, Bangladesh. I study women’s hybrid sartorial practices to investigate how new women merge the boundaries of respectable middle-class Bengali cultural attire of sari and salwar kameez with working-class Islamic religious attire of hijab and upper-class and Western women’s sexualised attires, a hybrid aesthetic practice which I call smart dressing. New women’s practices of smart dressing distinguish them as a symbolic group challenging the boundaries of tradition and modernity, local and global and provide an image of womanhood that is contrary to the poor, uneducated, traditional, bound by religion, sexually constrained and victimised ‘third world woman’.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: new middle class, Bangladesh, women, neoliberalism, aesthetic labour, clothing practices, hybrid, Muslim women, new woman, cosmopolitan, distinction, cultural authorisation
Subjects: L200 Politics
L300 Sociology
L400 Social Policy
L500 Social Work
L600 Anthropology
L700 Human and Social Geography
L900 Others in Social studies
N900 Others in Business and Administrative studies
T300 South Asian studies
T400 Other Asian studies
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Criminology and Sociology
UoA Collections > REF2021 UoA21: Sociology
Depositing User: Nazia Hussein
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2018 08:26
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2018 08:26
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5805

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