Consumers’ Attitudes to the Concept of Sustainable Retail Centres

Higgins, David and Verhovetchi, Natalia and Speakman, Chris (2018) Consumers’ Attitudes to the Concept of Sustainable Retail Centres. In: 25th Conference of the European Real Estate Society, 3-7 July 2018, Reading.

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Abstract

As shopping centres evolve, there is considerable emphasis on establishing and promoting a green shopping centre agenda to the local community. This exploratory study attempts to contribute to a more accurate understanding of the consumer’s attitudes towards sustainable retail development practices. Data for this study was collected through a web questionnaire to examine the relationship between distinct categories of personal factors (such as attitudes, desire, concerns) and opinions on sustainability practices in shopping centres. The survey findings from 44 respondents revealed that environment factors and the moral obligation exert a major influence on perceived attractiveness of sustainable shopping premises for consumers. These results show that a green building and green practices in shopping centres are widely encouraged by consumers and so provide an endorsement of shopping centre sustainability credentials.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Sustainability, Shopping centre, Green practices, Consumer attitude
Subjects: K900 Others in Architecture, Building and Planning
Divisions: Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Engineering and the Built Environment
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Engineering and the Built Environment > Resilient Environments
UoA Collections > REF2021 UoA13: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning
Depositing User: Ian Mcdonald
Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2018 07:22
Last Modified: 05 Jul 2018 07:22
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6090

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