Barriers inhibiting the transition to sustainability within the Australian construction industry: An investigation of technical and social interactions

Martek, I. and Reza Hosseini, M.R. and Shrestha, A. and Edwards, D.J. and Durdyev, S. (2019) Barriers inhibiting the transition to sustainability within the Australian construction industry: An investigation of technical and social interactions. Journal of Cleaner Production, 211. pp. 281-292. ISSN 09596526 (ISSN)

[img] Text (Accepted Version)
Manuscript IDF 1 Revision 01 clean.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 20 February 2021.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (832kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Research concedes that the building industry in Australia has fallen short of satisfying sustainability requirements. Currently, the responsibility for transitioning the building industry into one that is sustainable is laid largely at the feet of low-carbon governance instruments such as mandatory codes and sustainability rating tools. The behavior of groups, interactions of individual actors, relationship between actors' and group level behaviors that affect implementation of these instruments have, however, received only cursory attention. This study therefore seeks to move beyond the instruments debate and identify a broader range of factors inhibiting the transition to sustainability within the Australian building industry. It draws on focus group discussions held with 26 leading sustainability experts and practitioners from around the country. Whereas, earlier work on impediments to sustainability pre-identify potential causal factors, this study, with Sustainability Transition as the theoretical lens, allowing for new and as yet unidentified impediments to emerge. Indeed, while findings confirm a range of technical shortcomings hindering sustainability transition, the deeper barrier is shown to be the prevalence of a dysfunctional sustainability ecosystem where siloed vested interest groups exploit Australia's ineffective transition regimes for their own gain. The practical implication is that current efforts to refine rating tools and modify building practices – remedies identified in earlier research – will not be enough to effect meaningful transition, as long as end-users remain disenfranchised, confused and unpersuaded of the benefits of sustainable buildings.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Sustainability transitionGreen rating toolsGreen buildingsLow carbonSocial dynamicsSustainable construction
Subjects: K900 Others in Architecture, Building and Planning
Divisions: REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA13: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning
Depositing User: Euan Scott
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2019 15:44
Last Modified: 05 Mar 2019 14:16
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6986

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Research

In this section...