The Intensity of Childhood Trauma Has No Impact on The Cognitive Development of Decision-Making Style to be Exhibited in Adulthood

Katwa, Gemini and Bedwell, Stacey A. (2019) The Intensity of Childhood Trauma Has No Impact on The Cognitive Development of Decision-Making Style to be Exhibited in Adulthood. PsyPAG Quarterly. (In Press)

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Abstract

The literature clearly shows that childhood experiences, specifically those of trauma, have an impact on cognitive development. However, it remains unclear exactly how trauma influences the way in which high order cognitive processes, including decision-making are manifested in adulthood. Improving our understanding of the role childhood trauma has in the development of specific cognitive processes will aid in developing improved interventions and practices in the realm of childhood trauma. Here we investigated the relationship between intensity of childhood trauma, age of traumatic event, intensity of confiding in someone at the time of the traumatic event, and general decision-making style in adulthood. Participants completed the childhood traumatic events scale (CTES; Pennebaker & Susman, 2013), and decision-making style in adulthood (GDMS; Scott & Bruce, 1995). Intuitive decision-making style was most frequently seen, however no significant effect of intensity of childhood trauma, age, confiding on decision-making style in adulthood was observed. These findings indicate that intensity of childhood trauma may not impact the way in which decision-making develops.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Depositing User: Stacey Bedwell
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2019 10:04
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2019 10:04
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7139

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