Periphery Vision

Hillman, J (2016) Periphery Vision. In: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts, 2016. BCS Learning & Development, pp. 79-80. ISBN 978-1-78017-454-9

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Abstract

In this chapter I begin by suggesting digital photographic images should be considered as being neither a purely visual experience nor a purely perceptual one. Instead, these may be somewhat limiting terms which confine our engagement with images to traditional linguistic interpretations. At a time when digital images are more amenable and liable to forms of recombination, fragmentation and to being encountered through associations and connections, semiotic approaches to signification may no longer be the most appropriate tools for describing and explaining images.

In “Reading the Figural” (2001), D.N. Rodowick suggests a linguistic reading of images is both interrupted and disrupted by the different spatiotemporal organisation of contemporary forms of representation. His account of the figural is an attempt to reconcile image and text as being discursive in a non-linear, non-uniform and discontinuous sense. In this sense the figural is not a combination of image and text, it is an interstitial space located between them both that conforms to the properties of each but can be reduced to neither one nor the other.

Item Type: Book Section
Subjects: W600 Cinematics and Photography
Divisions: Faculty of Arts, Design and Media > School of Visual Communication
Depositing User: John Hillman
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2019 09:20
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2019 09:20
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7521

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