Determinants of blockchain adoption and perceived benefits in food supply chains

Kalaitzi, Dimitra and Jesus, Vitor and Campelos, Isabel (2019) Determinants of blockchain adoption and perceived benefits in food supply chains. In: Logistics Research Network (LRN), Wednesday 4 - Friday 6 September 2019, University of Northampton.

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Abstract

Purpose: Although some practitioners and academics emphasise the opportunities that Blockchain offers in supply chains, it is not yet widely adopted. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework in order to determine the factors influencing supply chain managers’ decision to adopt Blockchain and to explore the perceived benefits from its adoption.
Research approach: The research design adopted follows two sequential phases of data collection: systematic literature review and interview with experts and practitioners across the food supply chain.
Findings and Originality: Drawing from the technological, organisational, environmental (TOE) framework, a conceptual framework proposed that integrates various advantages of the Blockchain technology and several risks; these factors are used to explain supply chain managers intention to use Blockchain. The Blockchain adoption will in turn impact the level of perceived benefits such as supply chain transparency.
Research Impact: Regarding Blockchain, studies in the field of supply chain management focus on the identification of drivers, challenges and its applications but there is currently no holistic evaluation of the determinants of Blockchain adoption as well as the implications on supply chain performance. This study therefore presents a more holistic assessment of Blockchain adoption and its impacts on supply chain performance.
Practical Impact: This study produces a comprehensive set of benefits and risks to be considered by supply chain managers during the Blockchain adoption decision. Practitioners considering adoption of the technology could also justify potential efficiency and effectiveness related benefits.
Keywords: Blockchain, Food supply chain, Supply chain Performance, Technology adoption

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Date: 6 September 2019
Subjects: G200 Operational Research
G500 Information Systems
N100 Business studies
N200 Management studies
Divisions: Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment
Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Engineering and the Built Environment
Depositing User: Dimitra Kalaitzi
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2019 07:46
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2020 18:53
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7946

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