When Antibiotics Fail: The Expert Panel on the Potential Socio-Economic Impacts of Antimicrobial Resistance in Canada

Finlay, Brett B. and Conly, John and Coyte, Peter C. and Dillon, Jo-Anne R. and Douglas, Greg and Goddard, Ellen and Greco, Louisa and Nicolle, Lindsay E. and Patrick, David and Prescott, John F. and Quesnel-Vallee, Amelie and Smith, Richard and Wright, Gerard D. and Harfer, Marco and Taylor, Jirka and Yerushalmi, Erez (2019) When Antibiotics Fail: The Expert Panel on the Potential Socio-Economic Impacts of Antimicrobial Resistance in Canada. Project Report. Council of Canadian Academies, Ottawa, Canada.

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Abstract

Antimicrobials are life savers in Canada, enabling modern healthcare and playing a central role in agriculture. They have reduced the economic, medical, and social burden of infectious diseases and are part of many routine medical interventions, such as caesarean sections, joint replacements, and tonsillectomies.

As use of antimicrobials has increased, bacteria evolved to become resistant, resulting in drugs that are no longer effective at treating infections. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is increasing worldwide, and with widespread trade and travel, resistance can spread quickly, posing a serious threat to all countries. For Canada, the implications of AMR are stark.

When Antibiotics Fail examines the current impacts of AMR on our healthcare system, projects the future impact on Canada’s GDP, and looks at how widespread resistance will influence the day-to-day lives of Canadians. The report examines these issues through a One Health lens, recognizing the interconnected nature of AMR, from healthcare settings to the environment to the agriculture sector. It is the most comprehensive report to date on the economic impact of AMR in Canada.

Item Type: Monograph (Project Report)
Identification Number: 978-1-926522-75-3
Date: 21 November 2019
Uncontrolled Keywords: Antimicrobial Resistance, Canada, Economic Analysis Methodology, Health Economics, Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modelling
Subjects: A100 Pre-clinical Medicine
A300 Clinical Medicine
A900 Others in Medicine and Dentistry
C500 Microbiology
L100 Economics
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > Birmingham City Business School > Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics
Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > Birmingham City Business School > Centre for Applied Finance and Economics
Depositing User: Erez Yerushalmi
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2020 11:41
Last Modified: 12 May 2020 08:51
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/8927

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