Diagnostic performance of waist-to-height ratio in identifying cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome among adult Saudis. A cross-sectional study

Alzeidan, Rasmieh and Fayed, Amel and Rabiee-Khan, Fatemeh and Hersi, Ahmad and Elmorshedy, Hala (2020) Diagnostic performance of waist-to-height ratio in identifying cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome among adult Saudis. A cross-sectional study. Saudi Medical Journal, 41 (3). pp. 253-260. ISSN 0379-5284

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Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of waist to height ratio (WHtR) to screen for cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Saudis.

Methods: Between June 2013 and August 2014, a cross-sectional study of 3,063 adult Saudis of both genders from King Khalid Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was conducted. Using the “WHO STEPwise Surveillance-Instrument V2.1”, which uses sequential steps including questionnaires and anthropometric and biochemical measurements of MetS and CVRF. Waist to height ratio validity in defining central obesity, MetS, and CVRF were tested using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy. Using multivariate regression analyses for adjustment of confounders as age and gender were applied to compute adjusted odds ratios (aOR).

Results: The diagnostic potential of WHtR was excellent for central obesity (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.98), and MetS (AUCs = 0.86); it was good for CVRF ≥2 (AUCs = 0.79) and was satisfactory for dyslipidemia (AUCs = 0.66). The sensitivities and negative predictive values exceeded 85% for diagnosing central obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Adjusted odds ratios for age and gender showed that WHtR ≥0.50 significantly increased the risk of diabetes, hypertension, and ≥2 CVRF by almost 4-fold, and increased the risk of dyslipidemia by 2-fold.

Conclusion: Waist height ratio showed a good diagnostic performance for CVRF and MetS among Saudis. Furthermore, WHtR ≥0.5 increased the risk of dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

Item Type: Article
Date: 1 March 2020
Uncontrolled Keywords: waist to height ratio; metabolic syndrome; cardiovascular risk; Saudi Arabia
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Gemma Tonks
Date Deposited: 03 Mar 2020 14:19
Last Modified: 03 Mar 2020 14:19
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/8980

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