How frequent night-time bathroom visits can negatively impact sleep, well-being and productivity: Examining the associations between nocturia, well-being and economic outcomes in a working-age population

Hafner, Marco and Pollard, Jack and Troxel, Wendy M. and Yerushalmi, Erez and Fays, Clement and Whitmore, Michael and Van Stolk, Christian (2019) How frequent night-time bathroom visits can negatively impact sleep, well-being and productivity: Examining the associations between nocturia, well-being and economic outcomes in a working-age population. Technical Report. RAND Corporation.

[img]
Preview
Text
Hafner et al - 2019 RR3043 - Nocturia - frequent night-time bathroom visits.pdf - Published Version

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Nocturia is a condition caused by reduced nocturnal bladder capacity and/or a large urine volume produced during the night. It is also relatively common, with up to 20 per cent of the overall population being affected, and its prevalence increases with age. Given its sleep-interrupting nature, nocturia is regarded to have negative implications for individuals' daytime functioning and is potentially associated with lower life satisfaction and reduced levels of workplace productivity. This study is one of the first to comprehensively examine of the associations between nocturia and a range of health, wellbeing, demographic and economic variables in a working-age population.

Our results show a set of associations between nocturia and a range of conditions, outcomes and factors. On the one hand, it confirms in the working-age population what has been seen in other studies that focused more specifically on the older populations. We find that a range of chronic conditions are associated with nocturia, though our surveys do not capture all relevant chronic conditions. Not surprisingly, we see a strong association between nocturia and other sleep quality indicators such as the first interrupted period of sleep. On the other hand, our study can be more expansive about the economic and wellbeing effects of the condition given the range of data points that were collected in recent workplace surveys. Respondents who report two or more voids have lower work engagement, life satisfaction and lower work productivity resulting in lower individual wellbeing and costs to society and employers.

Item Type: Monograph (Technical Report)
Date: 2019
Uncontrolled Keywords: Economics, Health-Related Quality of Life, Labor Markets, Sleep, Urologic Disorders
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
B100 Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology
B300 Complementary Medicine
L100 Economics
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > Birmingham City Business School > Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics
Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > Birmingham City Business School > Centre for Applied Finance and Economics
Depositing User: Erez Yerushalmi
Date Deposited: 19 May 2020 11:54
Last Modified: 19 May 2020 11:54
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9236

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Research

In this section...