Claiming Victimhood: Victims of the 'Transgender Agenda'

Colliver, Ben (2021) Claiming Victimhood: Victims of the 'Transgender Agenda'. In: Handbook on Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse: International Perspectives and Experience. Emerald Publishing. ISBN 9781839828492

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Abstract

Transgender people have received substantial attention in recent years, with gender identity becoming a focal point of online debate. Transgender identities are central in discussions relating to sex-segregated spaces and activities, such as public toilets, prisons and sports participation. The introduction of ‘gender neutral’ spaces has received criticism focused on a perceived increased risk of sexual violence against women and children. However, little is known about the implications these constructions have for who is able to claim a ‘victim status’.
These issues are examined in this chapter in which I provide a critical analysis of the techniques used by individuals to align themselves with a ‘victim status’. These claims are presented and contextualized within varying notions of victimization, from being victims of political correctness to victims of a more aggressive minority community. This feeds into an inherently transphobic discourse that is difficult to challenge without facing accusation of perpetuating an individual’s ‘victimhood’. Transphobic rhetoric is most commonly expressed through constructing transgender people as ‘unnatural’, ‘sinful’ or as experiencing a ‘mental health issue’. This chapter argues that the denial of transphobia and simultaneous claims of victimization made by the dominant, cisgender majority are intrinsically linked.

Item Type: Book Section
Date: 19 February 2021
Uncontrolled Keywords: Transgender Transphobic Victimhood Gender neutral Discourse analysis
Subjects: L300 Sociology
Z999 UNSPECIFIED SUBJECT
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Criminology and Sociology
Depositing User: Ben Colliver
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2020 15:31
Last Modified: 25 Sep 2020 10:53
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9289

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