The relationship of offending style to psychological and social risk factors in a sample of adolescent males

Ashton, Sally-Ann and Ioannou, Maria and Hammond, Laura and Synnott, John (2020) The relationship of offending style to psychological and social risk factors in a sample of adolescent males. Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. ISSN 1544-4759

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Abstract

Research has indicated that life-course persistent offenders typically vary their offending style, following a criminal career progression from co to solo offending. Few studies have investigated the offenders who contemporaneously mix their style of offending. A sample of 1047 male adolescent offenders from the Pathways to Desistance study was investigated over a seven-year period. Participants were identified as solo, co or contemporaneous mixed style (CMS) offenders for each wave of data and one-way between groups analysis of variance was conducted to examine variations between the different offending styles in terms of offending frequencies, exposure to violence, peer antisocial behaviour and influence, resistance to peer influence, impulse control, and psychopathy. CMS offenders were found to consistently report significantly higher rates of offending and present significantly higher negative risk factors and lower protective risk factors than solo and co offenders for the duration of the study. A Multinomial Logistic Regression was used to investigate predictors of offending style with CMS as the reference category. Higher levels of exposure to violence and peer antisocial behaviour and lower levels of impulse control predicted membership of the CMS group for the first part of the study when compared with co-offenders; and higher levels of exposure to violence and peer antisocial behaviour continued to predict CMS offending when compared to solo offenders until the end of the study.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1002/jip.1548
Date: 1 June 2020
Uncontrolled Keywords: offending career progression, offending styles, psychological risk factors, social risk factors, youth offending
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Depositing User: Laura Hammond
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2020 15:58
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2020 08:44
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9293

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