British urban reconstruction after the Second World War: the rise of planning and the issue of ‘non-planning’

Larkham, Peter J. (2020) British urban reconstruction after the Second World War: the rise of planning and the issue of ‘non-planning’. Architektura & Urbanizmus, LIV (1-2). pp. 20-31. ISSN 0044-8680

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Abstract

Throughout urban history, settlements have been subject to a range of catastrophes, both natural and human. The manner in which settlements recover – if they do at all – is of considerable academic and practical interest. Much of the research carried out has been more focused on the socio-economic consequences of the catastrophe, or on the socio-economic, political and even bureaucratic processes of reconstruction. In almost all cases, the reconstruction is ‘planned’ in one form or another. Nevertheless, it is instructive to consider one such period of intensive planning, during and shortly after the Second World War, as the context to the concept of ‘non-plan’ which originated in the late 1960s, towards the end of the ‘reconstruction era’. For ‘non-plan’ could be seen as a product of too much planning, ineffective planning, or inappropriate delivery of plans.

Item Type: Article
Dates:
DateEvent
4 June 2020Accepted
1 October 2020Published
Subjects: CAH13 - architecture, building and planning > CAH13-01 - architecture, building and planning > CAH13-01-04 - planning (urban, rural and regional)
CAH20 - historical, philosophical and religious studies > CAH20-01 - history and archaeology > CAH20-01-01 - history
Divisions: Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Engineering and the Built Environment > Resilient Environments
Depositing User: Peter Larkham
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2020 10:18
Last Modified: 12 Jan 2022 16:45
URI: https://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9301

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