The Acceptability and Usability of Digital Health Interventions for Adults With Depression, Anxiety, and Somatoform Disorders: Qualitative Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis

Patel, Shireen and Akhtar, Athfah and Malins, Sam and Wright, Nicola and Rowley, Emma and Young, Emma and Sampson, Stephanie and Morriss, Richard (2020) The Acceptability and Usability of Digital Health Interventions for Adults With Depression, Anxiety, and Somatoform Disorders: Qualitative Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22 (7). e16228. ISSN 1438-8871

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Abstract

The prevalence of mental health disorders continues to rise, with almost 4% of the world population having an anxiety disorder and almost 3.5% having depression in 2017. Despite the high prevalence, only one-third of people with depression or anxiety receive treatment. Over the last decade, the use of digital health interventions (DHIs) has risen rapidly as a means of accessing mental health care and continues to increase. Although there is evidence supporting the effectiveness of DHIs for the treatment of mental health conditions, little is known about what aspects are valued by users and how they might be improved. This systematic review aimed to identify, appraise, and synthesize the qualitative literature available on service users' views and experiences regarding the acceptability and usability of DHIs for depression, anxiety, and somatoform disorders. A systematic search strategy was developed, and searches were run in 7 electronic databases. Qualitative and mixed methods studies published in English were included. A meta-synthesis was used to interpret and synthesize the findings from the included studies. A total of 24 studies were included in the meta-synthesis, and 3 key themes emerged with descriptive subthemes. The 3 key themes were initial motivations and approaches to DHIs, personalization of treatment, and the value of receiving personal support in DHIs. The meta-synthesis suggests that participants' initial beliefs about DHIs can have an important effect on their engagement with these types of interventions. Personal support was valued very highly as a major component of the success of DHIs. The main reason for this was the way it enabled individual personalization of care. Findings from the systematic review have implications for the design of future DHIs to improve uptake, retention, and outcomes in DHIs for depression, anxiety, and somatoform disorders. DHIs need to be personalized to the specific needs of the individual. Future research should explore whether the findings could be generalized to other health conditions. [Abstract copyright: ©Shireen Patel, Athfah Akhtar, Sam Malins, Nicola Wright, Emma Rowley, Emma Young, Stephanie Sampson, Richard Morriss. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 06.07.2020.]

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From PubMed via Jisc Publications Router ** History: received 12-09-2019; revised 20-02-2020; accepted 23-03-2020.
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.2196/16228
Date: 6 July 2020
Uncontrolled Keywords: anxiety, depression, digital health interventions, mobile phone, smartphone, somatoform disorders
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions: REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA 03: Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing & Pharmacy
Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > School of Nursing and Midwifery
SWORD Depositor: JISC PubRouter
Depositing User: JISC PubRouter
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2020 09:52
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2020 09:39
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9560

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