End-user engagement: The missing link of sustainability transition for Australian residential buildings

Martek, Igor and Reza Hosseini, M. and Shrestha, Asheem and Edwards, D.J. and Seaton, Stewart and Costin, Glenn (2019) End-user engagement: The missing link of sustainability transition for Australian residential buildings. Journal of Cleaner Production, 224. pp. 697-708. ISSN 0959-6526

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Abstract

This paper argues that attempts to transform Australia's urban environment into a sufficiently sustainable one has been misdirected. The ‘green rating tool,’ industry's adherence to relevant standards and governmental policies represent the primary means of effecting the sustainability transition.

However, only high-profile commercial building owners seem interested in being green-rated; the actual end-users of buildings are far less committed (e.g. employees ensconced in commercial buildings and residential home occupiers). Through a systematic review of 103 journal articles published on the topic of end-users and sustainability transition, original findings are presented. The findings reveal that most residential end-users do not purchase green homes and without their ‘buy-in,’ sustainability transition across Australia will continue to fail. This paper offers a critical analysis of the status-quo, identifying where the effort to generate a sustainable urban environment has been misdirected, what challenges prevail, and why residential end-users have been overlooked. In looking for a way forward that engages end-users, the paper proposes that financial incentives for the purchase of low-carbon buildings must be introduced into the residential real-estate market. And the modeling for this rebate is discussed in terms of emissions trading schemes or carbon tax.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.03.277
Date: 28 March 2019
Uncontrolled Keywords: Sustainable buildings, Occupants, Green transition, Low carbon living, Livable cities, Sustainable cities
Subjects: K200 Building
Divisions: Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment > School of Engineering and the Built Environment
Depositing User: Gemma Tonks
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2020 13:48
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2020 13:48
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9906

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