How and how well have older people been engaged in health care intervention design, development or delivery using co-methodologies: a scoping review with narrative summary

Cowdell, Fiona and Dyson, Judith and Sykes, Michael and Dam, Rinita and Pendleton, Rose (2020) How and how well have older people been engaged in health care intervention design, development or delivery using co-methodologies: a scoping review with narrative summary. Health and Social Care in the Community. ISSN 0966-0410

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Abstract

Co-methodological working is gaining increasing traction in health care, but studies with older people have been slower to develop. Our aim was to investigate how and how well older people have been engaged in health care intervention design, development or delivery using co-methodologies. We conducted a systematic search of four electronic databases to identify international literature published between 2009 and November 2019. We included peer-reviewed empirical research of any design. Three authors screened papers. Our review is reported in accordance with the Joanna Briggs Institute manual for scoping reviews, we have referred to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. We data extracted to a bespoke spreadsheet and used the Co:Create Co-production Matrix to guide quality appraisal. Included studies (n=48) were diverse in nature of interventions, co-methodologies and reporting. We offer a narrative summary of included papers. Establishing how older people were engaged in co-methodological work was largely straightforward. How well this was done was more challenging, however we have identified gems of good practice and offered directions for future practice. The Co:Create Co-Production Matrix was the best fit for evaluating papers, however it is not intended as a measure per se. In essence we argue that notions of ‘best’ and ‘scores’ are an oxymoron in co-methodological working, what is important that: i) researchers embrace these methods, ii) incremental change is the way forward, iii) researchers need to do what is right for people and purpose and iv) have time to consider and articulate why they are choosing this approach and how best this can be achieved for their particular situation. Future evaluation of participant’s experience of the process would enable others to learn about what works for who and in what circumstances.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: What is known about this topic? • Co-methodological working has become increasingly valued in health care • It is used less with older people What this paper adds • Co-methods frameworks, of which there are many, imply achievement of each included element is necessary. • Engagement at every stage of a project may be unrealistic if studies are prolonged and the level of commitment beyond what any older person can offer. • Reporting what co-methods work, when and for whom, would enhance future co-methodological research and practice.
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13199
Date: 25 October 2020
Uncontrolled Keywords: older, co-method, co-design, co-production, co-creation, participatory, review, health, intervention
Subjects: B700 Nursing
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > School of Nursing and Midwifery
REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA 03: Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing & Pharmacy
Depositing User: Fiona Cowdell
Date Deposited: 22 Sep 2020 14:43
Last Modified: 02 Nov 2020 10:54
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9933

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