Atypical lateralization of memory for location: Effects of deafness and sign language use

Cattani, Allegra and Clibbens, John (2005) Atypical lateralization of memory for location: Effects of deafness and sign language use. Brain and Cognition, 58 (2). pp. 226-239. ISSN 02782626

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Abstract

This paper examines the impact of auditory deprivation and sign language use on the enhancement of location memory and hemispheric specialization using two matching tasks. Forty-one deaf signers and non-signers and 51 hearing signers and non-signers were tested on location memory for shapes and objects (Study 1) and on categorical versus coordinate spatial relations (Study 2). Results of the two experiments converge to suggest that deafness alone supports the atypical left hemispheric preference in judging the location of a circle or a picture on a blank background and that deafness and sign language experience determine the superior ability of memory for location. The importance of including a sample of deaf non-signers was identiWed.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
UoA Collections > UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Depositing User: John Clibbens
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2017 09:58
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2017 09:58
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4156

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