The use of Activity Theory as an analytical tool for the music learning processes

Kinsella, Victoria and Fautley, Martin (2016) The use of Activity Theory as an analytical tool for the music learning processes. In: Contemporary Research in Music Learning Across the Lifespan: Music Education and Human Development. Routledge Studies in Music Education . Routledge, pp. 26-38. ISBN 9781138650428

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Abstract

Research concerning music development would benefit from an analytical tool that takes into consideration the interconnected elements of culture, environmental structure, and relationship to formations of mind and action. The range of diverse musical learning processes and behaviors present in the classroom and their development involves a range of interconnected interactions. The classroom is a multifaceted environment, where individual identities, dispositions, social and historical perspectives and pedagogical processes exist. Because of these complexities, the researcher must select a methodology that accounts for individual realities but also attributes collective understanding. This methodology must also consider how musical learning takes place, and its relationship to wider socio-cultural elements that shape development. Within this chapter we propose that Activity Theory (AT) (Engeström et al., 1999) is an analytical methodology that provides a lens through which to explore these interactions, and one which also takes into account aspects of cognition.

Item Type: Book Section
Date: 19 August 2016
Subjects: W300 Music
X200 Research and Study Skills in Education
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > Centre for Study of Practice and Culture in Education (C-SPACE) > Re-thinking Creativities
REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA23: Education
Depositing User: Victoria Kinsella
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2017 09:01
Last Modified: 20 May 2020 13:23
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5249

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