The influence of alkalosis on repeated high-intensity exercise performance and acid-base balance recovery in acute moderate hypoxic conditions.

Gough, Lewis Anthony and Brown, Danny and Deb, Sanjoy K and Sparks, S Andy and McNaughton, Lars R (2018) The influence of alkalosis on repeated high-intensity exercise performance and acid-base balance recovery in acute moderate hypoxic conditions. European journal of applied physiology, 118 (12). pp. 2489-2498. ISSN 1439-6327

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Abstract

PURPOSE

Exacerbated hydrogen cation (H) production is suggested to be a key determinant of fatigue in acute hypoxic conditions. This study, therefore, investigated the effects of NaHCO ingestion on repeated 4 km TT cycling performance and post-exercise acid-base balance recovery in acute moderate hypoxic conditions.

METHODS

Ten male trained cyclists completed four repeats of 2 × 4 km cycling time trials (TT and TT) with 40 min passive recovery, each on different days. Each TT series was preceded by supplementation of one of the 0.2 g kg BM NaHCO (SBC2), 0.3 g kg BM NaHCO (SBC3), or a taste-matched placebo (0.07 g kg BM sodium chloride; PLA), administered in a randomized order. Supplements were administered at a pre-determined individual time to peak capillary blood bicarbonate concentration ([HCO]). Each TT series was also completed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber set at 14.5% FiO (~ 3000 m).

RESULTS

Performance was improved following SBC3 in both TT (400.2 ± 24.1 vs. 405.9 ± 26.0 s; p = 0.03) and TT (407.2 ± 29.2 vs. 413.2 ± 30.8 s; p = 0.01) compared to PLA, displaying a very likely benefit in each bout. Compared to SBC2, a likely and possible benefit was also observed following SBC3 in TT (402.3 ± 26.5 s; p = 0.15) and TT (410.3 ± 30.8 s; p = 0.44), respectively. One participant displayed an ergolytic effect following SBC3, likely because of severe gastrointestinal discomfort, as SBC2 still provided ergogenic effects.

CONCLUSION

NaHCO ingestion improves repeated exercise performance in acute hypoxic conditions, although the optimal dose is likely to be 0.3 g kg BM.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Divisions: Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Lewis Gough
Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2018 15:25
Last Modified: 18 Dec 2018 15:25
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6632

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