The influence of eating psychopathology on autobiographical memory specificity and social problem-solving

Ridout, Nathan and Matharu, Munveen and Sanders, Elizabeth and Wallis, Deborah J. (2015) The influence of eating psychopathology on autobiographical memory specificity and social problem-solving. Psychiatry Research, 228 (3). pp. 295-303. ISSN 01651781

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Abstract

The primary aim was to examine the role of mood and eating psychopathology on autobiographical memory specificity (AMS) and social problem solving (SPS). A further aim was to establish if AMS mediated the relationship between eating psychopathology and SPS. A non-clinical sample of 52 female undergraduates completed the autobiographical memory test (AMT), where they were asked to retrieve specific memories of events from their past in response to emotional cue words, and the means-end problem-solving task (MEPS), where they were asked to generate means of solving a series of social problems. Participants also completed the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. After controlling for mood, high scores on the EDI subscales, particularly Drive-for-Thinness, were associated with the retrieval of fewer specific and a greater proportion of categorical memories on the AMT. High EDI scores were also associated with the generation of fewer and less effective means on the MEPS. Furthermore, AMS fully mediated the relationship between eating
psychopathology and SPS performance. The current findings have implications for individuals exhibiting high levels of eating psychopathology, as poor AMS and SPS are likely to impact negatively on their long term mood, psychological wellbeing and everyday social functioning.

Key words:
Overgeneral memory; social functioning; eating disorders; depression; anxiety

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C800 Psychology
L400 Social Policy
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
REF UoA Output Collections > REF2021 UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Depositing User: Deborah Wallis
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2018 17:19
Last Modified: 17 Dec 2018 09:58
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6728

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