Age effects on juvenile homicide perpetration

Hammond, Laura and Ioannou, Maria (2015) Age effects on juvenile homicide perpetration. Journal of Criminal Psychology, 5 (3). pp. 163-176. ISSN 2009-3829

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Abstract

Purpose
In order to address a notable gap in the research literature, the present study examined age-related differences in juvenile homicide perpetration.

Methodology
Data on 150 juvenile homicide offenders and their offences was derived from material available within the public domain, including media reports, case studies, court reports and previously published studies. Comparisons were then made between those aged 14 and under (N = 63) and those aged 14-17 (N = 87) across a range of offender, victim and offence-related variables.

Findings
There were no significant differences between the child (U-14) and adolescent (14-17) offender samples on any of the measured variables. The two groups had similar backgrounds, selected similar types of victims, had comparable breakdowns of different types of victim-offender relationship and had similar patterns of weapon use.

Research Implications and Limitations
The fact that the two groups did not differ significantly has notable implications in practical and applied domains. By identifying risk factors for juvenile homicide perpetration, findings open up a range of possibilities for identification, investigation and intervention. In addition, findings might inform the development of offender treatment and rehabilitation programmes. Key limitations relate to the quality and quantity of data employed. Ways of remedying these weaknesses in future research are addressed.

Originality/Value
This is the first study to directly compare child and adolescent perpetrators of homicide over a broad range of offender, victim and offence attributes.

Keywords:
Juvenile Homicide; Child Murderers; Age Effects; Offender Background; Offence Characteristics

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences > Dept. Psychology
UoA Collections > REF2021 UoA 04: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Depositing User: Silvio Aldrovandi
Date Deposited: 27 Mar 2018 12:13
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2018 12:13
URI: http://www.open-access.bcu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5762

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